Jabra’s Elite 65t are the most versatile headphones you can buy

Jabra’s Elite 65t are the most versatile headphones you can buy

Let’s face it: Most of us don’t want to spend our hard-earned cash on multiple pairs of headphones laying around for specific uses. Sure, it’s nice to have your travel set, another for the gym and a third for pristine audio at the office, but for a lot of people, that can be overkill. Instead, you need a single set of headphones that can keep the music going comfortably during the day while also standing up to a sweaty workout. You need a set that can do both.

If you’d told me a year ago that I’d be using a pair of true wireless earbuds as my go-to set of headphones, I would’ve laughed at you. The untethered audio accessories have come a long way since their introduction. Late last year, I discovered the first set of wireless in-ears that made a lasting impression: Bose’s SoundSport Free. Those had some issues I couldn’t overlook — namely trouble syncing — so I wasn’t entirely sold on this type of audio device yet.

Enter Jabra’s Elite 65t. These true wireless earbuds were announced back at CES and shipped a few months after. There aren’t any flashy features per se, but they aren’t needed. These earbuds work well, and I haven’t encountered any sync issues in the few months I’ve been wearing them. The Elite 65t come tucked inside a charging case, like almost all untethered in-ears do these days. That accessory adds two full charges to the earbuds’ five-hour battery life. In other words, there’s plenty of juice here to get you through a full workday, even if you have to let the Elite 65t take a nap during lunch or an afternoon meeting. In fact, you’ll need just 15 minutes for 1.5 hours of listening, thanks to a rapid-charge feature.

Unlike the SoundSport Free, the Elite 65t nestles nicely in your ear and doesn’t stick out too far from your head to make you look strange. Jabra didn’t sacrifice onboard controls to keep the buds small; you still have easy access to volume and track adjustments as well as your virtual assistant and the ability to answer calls without picking up your phone. And those controls work well, even if it does take a few tries to use them in a way that doesn’t push the earbuds farther into your ear.

One issue with the Elite 65t is the lack of comfy foam tips. There are some options in the box for different sizes, but they’re all the silicon type. I was able to snag some foam tips from another pair of earbuds, and you’ll likely be able to nab a pack for a few extra dollars. Heck, it may not even be an issue for you. For me, though, having something stuck in my ears for hours at a time eventually got uncomfortable with the rubber tips — an issue where a tiny bit of foam offers some welcome relief.

The Elite 65t is also IP55-rated, so you won’t have to worry about some dust or water destroying your investment. This means they’re perfectly suited for the gym or any other sweat-soaked activity you have planned. Sure, you could wear your Beats or Bose over-ear headphones to the gym, but those aren’t explicitly sweat resistant, so you’re taking a risk when it comes to moisture. I see people do it all the time, but I’m not one to spend more than $300 on headphones every few months, so I’d rather protect my purchase.

Speaking of the gym, Jabra’s Sound+ app offers a transparency mode, so you don’t have to remove the earbuds to ask for a spot without yelling. A lot of headphones offer this nowadays, but it’s still a nice feature that’s worth pointing out. A lot of earbuds (and headphones, for that matter) that I’ve tested at the gym aren’t loud enough to block out the noise around you. That’s not the case here. The Elite 65t has enough power to keep you locked in at the gym, at your desk or anywhere you need help focusing on the task at hand.

Comfort is only part of the equation when it comes to headphones. They need to sound good too. The Elite 65t doesn’t have audiophile-grade sound by any means, but the audio quality is still very nice. Highs are crisp and clear, and there’s a good amount of bass so that those high-energy hip-hop or metal tracks keep you going through your final set. The Elite 65t also handles more-detailed genres like bluegrass well, with enough clarity that you can pick out individual instruments while still enjoying good overall sound. If you need to make some minor EQ tweaks, you can do so via that Sound+ app. Just don’t expect any major re-tuning as the changes are modest.

Sound quality on calls is also quite good, especially if you’re in a room that isn’t too noisy. Outside on a busy street — well, that’s a different story. The only time the person on the other end had trouble hearing me with the Elite 65t was when I was walking down a bustling city sidewalk. Even then they could still hear me; they just got a lot of background noise too. I don’t find myself walking downtown often, though, and these will probably handle calls while you’re walking across campus or most other places just fine.

The competition

At $170, what you get in the Elite 65t is simply a better deal than many of the pricier rivals. Bose SoundSport Free will cost you $200, and Sony’s true wireless sports earbuds, the WF-SP700N, are $180. Yes, the Elite 65t is slightly more expensive than Apple’s $159 AirPods, but the audio is better here and you don’t have to walk around with what looks like a Q-tip sticking out of your ear. Worth the extra $11, if you ask me.

For significantly less than $200, Jabra’s Elite 65t is a solid all-around headphone option that offers both good audio quality and worry-free use at the gym. When you combine that with the compact charging case you can easily carry in your pocket and respectable battery life, it’s easy to see why it made such a lasting impression. And why I don’t plan to stop using it anytime soon.

View the Original Article . . .

{authorlink}
https://www.engadget.com/rss.xml Engadget RSS Feed

Engadget is a web magazine with obsessive daily coverage of everything new in gadgets and consumer electronics

https://www.blogsmithmedia.com/www.engadget.com/media/feedlogo.gif?cachebust=true

Pixel 3 review: Google pairs an amazing camera with serious AI smarts

Pixel 3 review: Google pairs an amazing camera with serious AI smarts

Of all the things I liked about the Pixel 3 (and its larger counterpart the Pixel 3 XL), I was most impressed by the vibrant and sharp photos it takes, even in low light, with a single rear camera. That’s something the Pixel’s competition, including the iPhone XS ($1,337 at Amazon Marketplace) and Galaxy Note 9, need two cameras (or at times, even more) to pull off.

But the other half of the Pixel’s draw is Google’s software and the entire ecosystem it’s ingrained with. Google wants you to use Assistant and it wants you to integrate it with other Google services like Gmail and Calendar. At times it’s useful — particularly Assistant’s new ability to answer calls on your behalf. (Yes, it’s as bonkers as it sounds, but it does help to combat the scourge of spam calls in my life.) The constant notifications and tips and prompts get annoying, but fortunately you can turn these functions off.

So is an outstanding camera and Google’s user experience worth the $799 (£739, AU$1,199) starting price for the 64GB Pixel 3? At face value, the phone seems to cost as much as the Galaxy S9 ($659 at Amazon) and it’s cheaper compared to the iPhone XS’ $1,000 (£999, AU$1,629) baseline price. But when we start factoring in storage capacity — like the fact that the S9 can hold up to 400GB of extra data and that the 256GB iPhone is actually cheaper in terms of price per gig — things get more complicated.

106-google-pixel-3

View full gallery

The Pixel 3 (left) and larger Pixel 3 XL.


Sarah Tew/CNET

Keep in mind, too, that the Pixel 3 is available in a larger model. The Pixel 3 XL starts at $899 (£869, AU$1,349). It offers a larger 6.3-inch screen (compared with this model’s 5.5-inch display), a bit more battery life and a soon-to-be “hideable” notch on its display. But features, including the cameras, are otherwise the same, so you’re basically choosing between two sizes.

If you don’t absolutely need a phone right now, wait to see what the iPhone XR or even the OnePlus 6T — both just days away — have in store. They’re expected to have excellent cameras themselves and more affordable price tags. You should also skip the Pixel if a built-in 3.5mm headphone jack is a must-have, but keep in mind that Google includes USB-C headphones and a 3.5mm adapter in the box.

But if you want a phone now, the Pixel 3 and 3 XL are one of the best phones you can buy. They may not look as luxurious as the iPhone XS or Galaxy S9 but they enjoy the extra perks that come from being a Google phone, which include unlimited cloud storage and timely software updates. And with their first-class and easy-to-use cameras, the Pixel 3 and 3 XL are top notch.

Pixel’s exceptional camera delivers again

If the Pixel 2 ($649 at Google Store)‘s camera was excellent, the Pixel 3 is exceptional. The Pixel 3 takes impressive low-light photos, records steady video and pulls off solid portrait photos with only one rear lens compared to phones that use two cameras for the same effect. Its wide dynamic range handles varying lighting and exposures particularly well, at times producing images that look better than in real life.

09-google-pixel-3

View full gallery

The Pixel 3 has a single 12.2-megapixel rear camera.


Sarah Tew / CNET

New camera software also aims to improve photo quality. Top Shot, which works when you take “Motion” pictures, looks for smiles and open eyes to recommend the best image in a series. To improve its digital zoom, the Pixel combines several photos together and processes super detailed, zoomed-in shots. Google also improved the camera’s low-light capabilities, known as Night Sight, but this specific feature won’t be available until later this year.

In general, the Pixel 3 takes brilliant photos, capturing images that are detailed and clear. The colors are a tad more intense than you’d see on the iPhone XS, but not to a level that’s unrealistic or exaggerated. The Pixel also handled white-balance and its skin tones were more true to life than the Galaxy S9 and Note 9 at times. It also retained more details with darker shadows than the Galaxy phones.

The camera is skillful at taking portrait photos too. They take a few seconds to render, but the falloff between the fore- and background looks natural and not overly smooth. When I took a photo of a dog, I noticed a patchy-looking stray hair or two, but the effect was minimal. And the Pixel gives you the option to tweak the blurriness and focus of these portraits after you fire the shutter, similar to the iPhone XS and other Android phones. The editing process is precise and easy to use.

Taking a picture with Portrait Mode on (left) and off (right).


Lynn La/CNET

In this indoor photo, the fish and clams all look detailed and crisp.


Lynn La/CNET

Zooming in max at this building near Madison Square Park. The Pixel combines several photos together to process these detailed, zoomed-in shots.


Lynn La / CNET

In this low-light image, the camera still captured details of people’s faces and the bar in the back.


Lynn La/CNET

The Pixel 3’s expert handling of different lighting sources and exposures captured this vibrant shot.


Lynn La/CNET

In this closeup shot taken outdoors, you can see how each phone captured its own great image, but all of them handled color differently.


Lynn La/CNET

View the Original Article . . .

Lynn La {authorlink}
https://www.cnet.com/g00/3_c-6bbb.hsjy.htr_/c-6RTWJUMJZX77x24myyux78x3ax2fx2fbbb.hsjy.htrx2fwx78x78x2fwjanjbx78x2f_$/$/$/$?i10c.ua=1&i10c.dv=14 CNET Reviews – Most Recent Reviews

CNET brings you the top unbiased editorial reviews and ratings for tech products, along with specs, user reviews, prices and more.

http://i.i.cbsi.com/cnwk.1d/i/ne/gr/prtnr/CNET_Logo_150.gif

‘Spacesuits’ protect microbes destined to live in space

‘Spacesuits’ protect microbes destined to live in space

Scientists have created a unique system that pairs light-absorbing semiconductors with anaerobic bacteria to capture light and fix carbon dioxide: an artificial leaf. The bacteria turn carbon dioxide into chemicals useful in space colonies. One problem is that the process generates reactive oxygen species that kill the bacteria. To shield them from damage, the researchers developed a ‘spacesuit’ of metal-organic framework (MOF) that extends the microbes’ lifetimes to that seen in the wild.

Continue reading . . .

{authorlink}
https://www.sciencedaily.com/rss/top/environment.xml Top Environment News — ScienceDaily

Top stories featured on ScienceDaily’s Plants & Animals, Earth & Climate, and Fossils & Ruins sections.

https://www.sciencedaily.com/images/scidaily-logo-rss.png

Researchers demonstrate shark vertebral band pairs are related to growth, not time

Researchers demonstrate shark vertebral band pairs are related to growth, not time,

Band pairs in shark vertebrae have been used for decades to estimate shark age, of practical use in conserving overfished sharks and managing the remaining shark fisheries. However, recent research demonstrates that previous methods used to determine the age of sharks have underestimated those ages, particularly in older sharks.

,

Continue reading . . .

, ,
https://www.sciencedaily.com/rss/top/environment.xml, Top Environment News — ScienceDaily,

Top stories featured on ScienceDaily’s Plants & Animals, Earth & Climate, and Fossils & Ruins sections.

, https://www.sciencedaily.com/images/scidaily-logo-rss.png,
,

Snap now sells its second-gen Spectacles on Amazon

Snap now sells its second-gen Spectacles on Amazon,

Snap went the odd-but-fun route when it released the first version of Spectacles, selling pairs through vending machines strategically placed in big US and European cities. While that’s certainly an interesting tactic, the company chose to make its s…

,


Continue reading . . .

, ,
https://www.engadget.com/rss.xml, Engadget RSS Feed,

Engadget is a web magazine with obsessive daily coverage of everything new in gadgets and consumer electronics

, https://www.blogsmithmedia.com/www.engadget.com/media/feedlogo.gif?cachebust=true,
,

‘Dallas & Robo’ pairs a trucker and a robot to save the solar system

‘Dallas & Robo’ pairs a trucker and a robot to save the solar system

, ,

Earlier the month, YouTube announced a new Kat Dennings- and John Cena-led animated series for its Red, soon to be Premium, platform — a buddy comedy from the company behind BoJack Horseman about a space trucker and a robot. In Dallas & Robo, th…

,


Continue reading . . .

, ,
https://www.engadget.com/rss.xml, Engadget RSS Feed,

Engadget is a web magazine with obsessive daily coverage of everything new in gadgets and consumer electronics

, https://www.blogsmithmedia.com/www.engadget.com/media/feedlogo.gif?cachebust=true,