A cryptocurrency company’s covert bug fix has confusing legal implications

A cryptocurrency company’s covert bug fix has confusing legal implications

On Tuesday, February 5, the Zcash Company, the for-profit company in charge of maintaining the cryptocurrency Zcash, made a shocking revelation: it had acted in secret to fix a software bug that would have given an attacker the means to create “fake” Zcash.

What’s shocking is not that Zcash had a flaw. It’s that just a handful employees knew about it and (as far as we know) kept it secret for eight months before fixing it. The way the team handled the issue probably wouldn’t be quite so controversial if Zcash were a traditional software company. But this is crypto, where enthusiasts expect everything to be transparent and decentralized. Perhaps more important, this episode is a reminder that we lack clear definitions to distinguish between “centralized” and “decentralized” blockchain systems—even as policymakers have begun attaching real legal implications to these labels.

The story begins in March. According to a lengthy blog post, that’s when Zcash cryptographer Ariel Gabizon discovered a “subtle cryptographic flaw” in an academic paper Zcash relied on to develop its technology. Zcash uses a fancy cryptographic tool called a zero-knowledge proof to let users transact anonymously. It allows transactions to be validated without giving away any other information about them.

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The vulnerability Gabizon found is so subtle that expert cryptographers missed it for years, write the authors of the blog post. In fact, that’s one reason the company believes no one else was wise to the flaw. “Discovery of the vulnerability would have required a high level of technical cryptographic sophistication that very few people possess,” they write, adding that they’ve seen no evidence of any counterfeiting (though they admit they can’t be certain).

After discovering the bug, the small team in the know decided the safest course was to disclose it only after it was fixed. According to Fortune, they used encrypted communications and “carefully selected confidantes to prevent rogue insiders, spies, or hackers from gaining knowledge of the vulnerability.” Finally, in October, they sneaked the bug fix into an upgrade that had been planned beforehand.

Assuming we trust the company’s confidence that leaving the bug unpatched for so long was safe since so very few people have the cryptographic expertise to exploit it, we’ve still got to ask: do the company’s actions here mean Zcash is actually centralized?

Unfortunately, we aren’t yet able to reach a meaningful answer, since we still don’t have an agreed-upon definition of “decentralization.” To date, this hasn’t had much real-world consequence; debates over whether certain coins are truly decentralized have been mostly ideological. But given that “decentralized” is transitioning from a marketing term into one that has real legal implications, this is problematic, writes Angela Walch, a professor at St. Mary’s University School of Law, in a new academic paper: “If we gloss over what [decentralization] means, we risk unintended consequences when these systems do not behave like we expect them to.”

Take, for instance, a speech delivered in June of 2018 by William Hinman, director of corporation finance for the US Securities and Exchange Commission. In it, Hinman called both Bitcoin and Ethereum “sufficiently decentralized” that their cryptocurrencies should not be regulated as securities, a category that includes stocks and bonds.

But since decentralization hasn’t been defined, Hinman’s standard is difficult to pin down. Other parts of his speech contradict his conclusion, argues Walch. For instance, Hinman says a digital asset may be a security (read: centralized) if “information asymmetries” exist between the promoters and the potential buyers (i.e., some people know more than others about its internal workings). If a small number of developers are keeping secrets, this kind of asymmetry does exist, writes Walch.

We’ve already seen this happen in Bitcoin and Ethereum, she argues. In September of 2018, fewer than a dozen developers of Bitcoin Core, the main Bitcoin software client, waited for days before disclosing a critical bug they had discovered in the latest version. In November, lead developers for Ethereum faced backlash from some in the community after they held several private meetings to discuss proposed software upgrades.

As for Zcash, Walch tweeted on Tuesday, if four people keeping a critical bug secret for months doesn’t demonstrate centralization, “I don’t know what would.”

Even if that’s true, so what? Presumably, policymakers will eventually tell us—once they decide what decentralization actually means.

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Netflix for iOS can automatically download new episodes

Netflix for iOS can automatically download new episodes


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Netflix just made it easier to keep a Marie Kondo marathon going on your iPhone — the company’s Smart Downloads feature has finally made the leap to iOS. As on Android and Windows, the feature will automatically delete episodes you’ve watched and download the next one so long as you’re on a WiFi network. You’ll always have an episode ready for your commute, but won’t have to consume gobs of storage for the privilege.

You can turn the feature off from the app’s Download section if you’d rather manually grab shows for a long flight. The iOS addition is overdue (Android users received Smart Downloads last July), but it’s more than welcome if you’d rather not juggle episodes just to be sure you have something to watch.

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Twitter says abuse reports have fallen by 16 percent

Twitter says abuse reports have fallen by 16 percent

Twitter’s attempts to improve the “health” of its conversation are paying dividends, according to the company’s latest financial figures. The company is reporting a 16 percent fall in the number of abuse reports year on year, and a commensurate surge in profitability. In the last three months, Twitter pulled in revenues of $909 million, coining a tidy $255 million net profit.

Those figures are a big deal compared to what Twitter pulled in a year ago, and revenues have risen from $665 million from Q1 through to $909 million now. $791 million of that figure comes from advertising revenue, split $425 million in the US compared to $366 internationally — while data licensing making up the other $117 million.

Twitter rarely talks about the number of Daily Active Users, saying that it’s a poor metric that would easily be misinterpreted. Normally, it’ll only share the growth rates each quarter, showing how many Twitterers are tweeting on a daily basis compared to the previous year. This time, however, the company has revealed the number of “Monetizable” Daily Active Users, namely those who Twitter can use for targeted advertising.

And, for the natural accusations that Twitter is choosing flattering figures to show to investors, the mDAU count looks pretty good. The report says that the number of daily active users is increasing, up from 124 million in Q3 to 126 million in Q4. 27 million of those are in the US, while 99 are international, but given the profit figures, it’s clear that fewer, higher-quality users is helping Twitter make a profit.

Monthly active users, meanwhile, have fallen significantly — from a high of 336 at the start of the financial year to 321 million now. Twitter will, however, keep banging the drum that the majority of those accounts were spam, fake or otherwise unwanted on the service. And, from next quarter, it will stop reporting on its monthly user figures, which may make investors jittery that they’re not getting the data they need.

The company says that it will spend 2019 taking a “more proactive approach to reducing abuse and its effects on Twitter.” Part of that will be to reduce “the burden on victims of abuse” and “taking action before abuse is reporting.” In addition, Twitter will work to make it harder for politically-motivated groups and fraudsters to create accounts en-masse. The company added that its “enforcement on reported content was 3x more effective,” but didn’t clarify what that figure actually meant.

It’s likely that we’ll also get more unwanted features, like being forced to see Top Tweets, which created a spike in daily active users. But it’s clear that, with profits increasing and users apparently happy, we’re a long way from the dark times of 2016. After all, back then, the company was seen as a target for a number of brands that walked away because of Twitter’s notorious toxicity.

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Nintendo is finally opening a flagship store in Japan

Nintendo is finally opening a flagship store in Japan


Mat Smith/Engadget

Nintendo relaunched Pokémon Center NY as Nintendo New York back in 2016, making it the company’s first retail center in the world. Soon, the gaming giant will have two flagship stores in existence: it’s scheduled to finally open a flagship store in its home country this coming fall. It’s strange how such a storied Japanese corporation is now only opening its own store in its home turf when smaller ones like Line and The Pokémon Company have been running retail centers for years. But at least Nintendo is finally doing something about it. According to Japan Times, Nintendo Tokyo will occupy a whole floor in Parco department store Shibuya, which is still currently under renovation.

As you’d expect, the retail center will mostly be used to showcase and sell the Switch console, its games and Nintendo’s character merchandise, such as amiibo figures. But the gaming titan also plans to use the space to host events and to offer fans the opportunity to try out its games, making Shibuya — Tokyo’s youth-oriented district — a great location for it.

Nintendo revealed in its Q3 2018 earnings report that it sold 9.41 million Switch consoles in the three months leading up to December 31st, 2018. It’s expecting a dip in shipments this year, but it’s also reportedly planning to release a smaller Switch to prop up its sales. If it does manage to launch a new Switch in the near future, Nintendo will probably give visitors at the soon-to-open Shibuya flagship the chance to test it out.

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Intel gives interim CEO Robert Swan the full-time job

Intel gives interim CEO Robert Swan the full-time job


Intel

Intel has announced that the company’s interim CEO now has the job on a full-time basis. Robert “Bob” Swan has been appointed to lead the chipmaker as its seventh CEO. Swan took over on an initially temporary basis seven months ago, but was rubber-stamped by the board today. In a letter sent to all employees, Swan said that he was “honored and humbled” to be named its permanent leader.

Swan was previously Intel CFO, and stepped in to the top job after predecessor Brian Krzanich suddenly left his position. Krzanich’s departure was due to the disclosure of a “past consensual relationship” with an Intel employee, violating the company’s non-fraternization policies.

The new CEO outlined a number of causes that he will champion under his now official leadership at Intel. “Our execution must improve. And it will. Our customers are counting on us,” which could be a dig at the company’s recent manufacturing woes. A combination of security updates and an inability to produce enough chips forced Swan to publicly admit that Intel was struggling to make the chips its customers wanted.

In addition, Swan wants to continue Intel’s transition from a PC company to one that is “data-centric” and to be bold rather than defensive. That may be a hint that Swan is dissatisfied at how much ground Intel has lost in mobile and in data centers.

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The Morning After: An end to vape clouds

The Morning After: An end to vape clouds


ABC 7

We’re leaping over hump day.

Apple’s iPhone sales have struggled in China, and while it’s affected the company’s bottom line, it’s not all doom and gloom. Elsewhere, one company made a filter to destroy those innocuous vape clouds, and we review Huawei’s MateBook 13 — which looks mighty familiar.


And its new streaming service should help even more.
Apple’s services help anchor a company rocked by slow iPhone sales

Apple seemed intent on preparing Wall Street for the worst, but its recent financials painted a picture that wasn’t as bad as some had expected. The company raked in $84.3 billion in overall revenue in Q1 — that’s down about five percent from Q1 2018. Apple was eager to note that this was still the second-most lucrative quarter in the company’s history. As expected, though, phones sales did dip dramatically: Revenue was down 15 percent compared to last year. (That said, the company says it has an installed base of 900 million iPhones now.)

Fortunately for Apple, its services business — which accounts for Apple Music, iCloud, app purchases, Apple Care and more — continues to be one of its star performers. Total services revenue was up around 19 percent from Q1 last year. Considering the notable decrease in appeal iPhones now have in one of Apple’s most important markets, squeezing more revenue out of its existing customers will only become more important over time — why else would Apple allow Samsung TV owners to dip into its services?


Philter’s Pocket lets you chug away without fogging up the room.
Now there’s a handheld filter to kill your massive vape clouds

Despite growing evidence that vape clouds are less toxic than tobacco smoke, they still have an antisocial effect and can reduce air quality. Also: No one wants to be blinded walking through someone else’s exhale and not everyone’s into your blueberry-cheesecake vibes. Enter Philter and its Pocket device — a $15 widget you breathe into to eliminate cigarette or vape clouds. James Trew tests it out.


The teen and his mom attempted to get Apple’s attention for more than a week.
A 14-year-old tried to warn Apple about the group FaceTime bug

A 14-year-old Arizona high schooler tried to warn Apple about its FaceTime bug, but didn’t make much progress. According to the Wall Street Journal, Grant discovered the issue on January 20th while setting up a group FaceTime conversation with his friends for a session of Fortnite. After discovering the issue, Grant and his mom took to Twitter and Facebook in attempts to get Apple’s attention. They even tried old-school phone calls and faxes, but with no success.


They’re also fast enough to take 8K into the mainstream.
Samsung says its new 8K TV chips will eliminate bezels

Samsung has unveiled a single display driver IC chip with enough bandwidth to allow true 8K images to be transmitted to 8K display panels without the need for other components. That will eliminate the need for a bezel (where electronics are normally hidden), allowing for true all-display TV sets — and prettier hardware designs, too.


An uninspiring MacBook Air clone.Huawei MateBook 13 review

Huawei’s MateBook laptop series impressed last year. The MateBook X and X Pro offered powerful performance, gorgeous displays and comfortable keyboards, all with heavy MacBook vibes. The company is looking to follow that success with the new MateBook 13, by offering similar quality at a slightly cheaper price. It’s a strong, well-rounded laptop, but that lower cost comes with some tradeoffs.


The four-minute short was made by a student in New York.
‘Wired’ is a multi-scene movie painted and animated in VR

Movies painted and animated with a VR headset are nothing new. Most are looping diorama-esque creations, however. The camera might move around, highlighting small details, but there isn’t much of a story. Wired, meanwhile, is different. It’s one of the first pieces of VR animation (that is, created inside VR) with multiple scenes and a discernible narrative. Zeyu Ren, a design student and motion graphics artist in New York, made this short all by himself.

But wait, there’s more…


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Huawei plagiarized a music video and turned it into a tablet ad

Huawei plagiarized a music video and turned it into a tablet ad

Huawei seems to have become a magnet for controversy of late. The company’s being shut out of 5G infrastructure bids across the world, the US is reportedly investigating it for stealing trade secrets, and its CFO was recently arrested for violating Iran sanctions. And at a time when mistrust in the firm is at an all-time high, Huawei now stands accused of straight up plagiarizing a music video in order to sell more tablets.

The track and video in question is Cymatics: Science Vs. Music by Nigel Stanford, which plays with sound visualization and production. That video was released in 2014, and it appears that a few years later Huawei used it as, errr, inspiration for an advert for its MediaPad M3 Lite.

The mimicry went undetected until now, but it’s hard to pass the similarities off as coincidence. Many shots and key visual elements are identical; the music in the MediaPad ad even sounds like an attempt at imitation. Huawei is notorious for skirting the boundaries of intellectual property, with recent entries in its copycat catalog including MacBook, Google Home and Apple HomePod dopplegängers.

For a company of Huawei’s size, though, it seems particularly underhand to rip off an artist’s work and repurpose it for advertising. And the fact that Stanford himself has flagged it means there was definitely no licensing involved. It could, of course, be the case that an agency or internal team passed the art direction off as original and Huawei higher-ups were none the wiser. Either way, we’ve reached out to Huawei for comment, and will update you when we hear back.

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BMW launches a performance Series-7 PHEV

BMW launches a performance Series-7 PHEV


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BMW has launched its 2020 7-series sedans, and controversy about the ginormous grill aside, they’re some of the company’s highest-tech models yet. The 740e xDrive has a plug-in hybrid 389 HP V6 with a 12.0 kWh battery that should allow for some grocery-getting purely on electrons (BMW hasn’t released range figures yet). That combo will accelerate you to 60 mph in just 4.9 seconds, but if that’s not fast enough, there’s also a 523 HP V8 on the 750i xDrive or a 600-horsepower twin-turbo V12 on the 760i.

The 7-series is as much about the driver tech as the mechanical bits. It has a new digital instrument cluster to go with the huge infotainment system, along with a touch display to entertain rear-seat passengers. Optionally, you can get a Bowers & Wilkins Diamond 3D surround sound system. To figure out how to work all that, there’s an “intelligent personal assistant” that learns your preferences for seat heating, frequently used routes, etc. It can even make casual conversation, BMW said.

BMW 7-series

BMW has unveiled a new version of its iDrive system, powered by “Live Cockpit Professional.” The active driving assistant comes with an active lane keeping assistant with side collision avoidance, steering and traffic jam assistant, automatic lane change, evasion assistant and more.

The parking assistant, meanwhile, can propose routes that offer you a better chance of finding a parking spot, and then automatically park into spaces either parallel or perpendicular to the road. It can also be used to automatically maneuver out of a spot, too. There’s no pricing yet (if you need to ask, etc.) and the new models launch into the market in April, 2019.

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Sony’s takes a different tack at CES 2019

Sony’s takes a different tack at CES 2019

Sony’s CES was a different one to previous years. The company’s new strategy seems to focus on its prowess in movies and music to elevate its products. That made for an unusual press event, but Sony has a plan. Head of Communications, Cheryl K. Goodman elaborates on how the company wants to make all the moving parts work together, whether that’s cameras, OLED TVs, mobile, PlayStation or everything else.

Goodman is joined by a second guest, robo-puppy Aibo, who’s celebrating its first birthday since its reinvention. We talk upgraded robot pets and what’s next.

Follow all the latest news from CES 2019 here!

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Spotify on the importance of podcasts, personalization and partnerships

Spotify on the importance of podcasts, personalization and partnerships

AI plays a huge role in how Spotify delivers personalized playlists to users, so it’s somewhat fitting that the company’s new partnership with Microsoft is focused on messages about how AI can impact all aspects of life — including education, healthcare and philanthropy. Those messages are going to be showing up in the Discover Weekly playlist for free users, the first time that Spotify has lets brands have full customization and control over advertising in that feed.

We talked with Spotify’s Danielle Lee, VP and Global Head of Partner Solutions, about how the company uses AI to power its personalized content, how it can apply that in the future to things like video and podcasts and how the company can offer branding options for Discover Weekly while keeping things relevant to listeners. We also chatted about Spotify’s new original podcast with journalist Jemele Hill.

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The Branding Of Cryptocurrency

The Branding Of Cryptocurrency

I’ve written before about how a company’s branding can play an oversized role in how it is perceived by investors. Something similar is happening now with cryptocurrency, as investments are driven less by the financial promise cryptocurrencies offer than the sense that blockchain and the underlying technology are hot areas to invest in. Case in point: Dogecoin, a currency created as a joke, recently hit a market cap of over $2 billion. Granted, an individual dogecoin is worth about two cents — but that’s still a remarkable valuation considering its inauspicious beginnings.

The issue is that it’s not just one currency that’s seeing massive growth. It’s all of them: Bitcoin, Ethereum, Ripple, Litecoin — each one of these is currently worth tens of billions of dollars, and given the general volatility of the cryptocurrency market, I wouldn’t be surprised to see more cryptocurrencies surging above the billion-dollar mark.

But what is it exactly about these currencies that’s causing so much frenzy? Is it that people like the decentralized nature of blockchain technology and the privacy that it facilitates? Or is it, as author Steven Johnson writes in The New York Times, that the “real promise” of blockchain “lies not in displacing our currencies but in replacing much of what we now think of as the internet, while at the same time returning the online world to a more decentralized and egalitarian system”? In other words, it’s not really about what Bitcoin is or how much it’s worth. It’s about what the currency stands for — basically, how it’s branded.

It might seem odd to say that a system built by an anonymous person or persons, and built with the central tenet of ensuring that no one person or entity could control it, has a distinct brand identity. After all, branding is usually associated with corporations, which are about as far from the democratic premise of Bitcoin as you can get. And yet, Bitcoin has a logo. It even has brand colors.

Branding, just like cryptocurrencies, is decentralized because companies don’t control the brand image — the public does. Even though Bitcoin isn’t overseen by a giant corporation with a huge brand marketing budget, the cryptocurrency’s brand value continues to grow in the marketplace through changing public perception.

One interesting thing about the current boom is how, in a few short years, people have moved from initial skepticism and outright derision of cryptocurrencies to enthusiastic acceptance. For Randall Stone, a branding expert who has worked with companies such as Samsung and Starbucks, the sheer number of cryptocurrencies that have popped up in the last few years in some ways “undermines the legitimacy of cryptocurrency” because it can easily become all about the gimmick; just look at Cagecoin, a currency designed to appeal to devotees of Nicholas Cage.

But Stone sees a larger trend in cryptocurrency and altcoins: “It does look like, eventually, these altcoin sites, these could be part of your cyber identity. What coins do you pay with? It’s going to be an expression, whether it’s an overt expression, or an anonymous expression, of who you are.” In essence, the craze over cryptocurrencies is less about the potentially game-changing technology behind blockchain (although that’s important too) and more about what using or investing in cryptocurrency says about a person.

While cryptocurrencies can be used for a variety of purposes, some have developed more specialized functions. Some, like Dogecoin, are used primarily on social media as a way of rewarding someone for their content. Others are used as gambling tokens or as an alternative to traditional payment systems. It remains to be seen whether these smaller, niche currencies can remain successful, especially given the volatility of the market and the risk of being hacked.

Right now, many brands are looking to leverage cryptocurrencies to their advantage. KFC recently declared that it would allow Canadian customers to purchase certain menu items using Bitcoin; venerable camera company Kodak announced that it would be rolling out its own cryptocurrency, Kodakcoin.

The fact that brands see value in jumping onto the cryptocurrency trend shows that there is real potential in the cryptocurrency market, but it also highlights the considerable challenges. The proliferation of smaller currencies and the mad rush of investors looking to get a piece of the Bitcoin pie has created something of a bubble. Not only that, but the more people rush to invest in cryptocurrencies, the more likely they are to neglect certain elements of safety and eschew the mobile wallets and security measures that would ensure the protection of their assets. Cryptocurrencies will likely be around for a while (the recent “cryptocurrency bloodbath” notwithstanding) and it’s important that people and companies understand the implications of branding.

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LG’s 49-inch, ultrawide monitor is a multitasker’s dream

LG’s 49-inch, ultrawide monitor is a multitasker’s dream

That rollable OLED TV from LG may have stolen the show at CES 2019, but the company’s got a slew of other interesting products up its sleeve. The LG 49WL95C is a 49-inch, ultrawide monitor (32:9 aspect ratio) with a Dual QHD display (5,120 x 1,440 resolution) and two built-in 10W stereo speakers with “Rich Bass.” The super wide and high-res screen also features support for HDR 10, USB Type-C and an adjustable stand that lets you swivel it, tilt it and tweak its height.

If you think it looks good in pictures, it’s even better in person. I saw it at LG’s CES 2019 booth and immediately day-dreamt about how fantastic it would look on my desk at home, even though my setup has always consisted of a single monitor. As expected, the screen is sharp, colors are vibrant and, most importantly, it’s hard to get past all that real estate you’ll have. It’s going to be perfect for multitaskers.

Gallery: LG’s 49WL95C and UltraGear monitors | 8 Photos

Meanwhile, for gamers, LG is showing off its latest 27- and 37.5-inch UltraGear gaming monitors, the 27GL850G and 38GL950G, respectively. They both come with QHD Nano IPS displays, a 144Hz refresh rate and compatibility with NVIDIA’s adaptive sync technology, aka G-SYNC.

Unfortunately, there are no price or availability details for any of these monitors right now, but we should learn all about that later this year. For now, some close-up pictures will have to suffice.

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AMD’s Radeon VII is the first 7nm GPU for consumers

AMD’s Radeon VII is the first 7nm GPU for consumers


AMD

AMD is making a big stab at 4K gaming with its new high-end video card, the Radeon VII. Announced during the company’s CES keynote, it’s notable for being the world’s first consumer 7nm GPU. That architecture allows it to be around 25 percent faster than the company’s last model, while using the same amount of power. The Radeon VII follows AMD’s 7nm Instinct GPUs, which were built for computational professionals, not gamers.

AMD Radeon VIIThe Radeon VII features 60 compute units running at speeds up to 1.8GHz, as well as 16GB of high bandwidth memory. During her CES keynote, AMD CEO Lisa Su showed off the GPU playing Devil May Cry 5 in 4K at over 60FPS. The gameplay looked pretty fluid, and I didn’t notice any slowdown. That demo appeared to be a video capture though — we have yet to see the Radeon VII in action in real time.

AMD isn’t talking about pricing or availability yet for the new GPU, unfortunately. But hopefully it’ll arrive soon, especially since NVIDIA’s RTX GPUs are already bringing 4K gaming to notebooks.

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Intel announces six new ninth-generation Core processors

Intel announces six new ninth-generation Core processors

Intel’s slightly subdued CES 2019 keynote began with the announcement of six new chips for desktop users. The company’s Gregory Bryant took to the stage to say that the company was launching a sextet of ninth-generation Core processors. These will range from the low-end Core i3 through to the Core i9 for power users. Sadly, the company hasn’t — yet — explained any more about the silicon it’s about to push out the door.

At the same time, Bryant tipped that the company would also be launching a new series of ninth-generation mobile processors in the second quarter of 2019. Again, the company hasn’t said very much about what we can expect, or what the performance will be. Don’t be surprised if both sets of chips are rare, at least initially, given the rumored struggles Intel has had getting chips out of the door.

Follow all the latest news from CES 2019 here!

After training to be an intellectual property lawyer, Dan abandoned a promising career in financial services to sit at home and play with gadgets. He lives in Norwich, U.K., with his wife, his books and far too many opinions on British TV comedy. One day, if he’s very, very lucky, he’ll live out his dream to become the executive producer of Doctor Who before retiring to Radio 4.


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We’re live from Samsung’s 2019 CES press conference!

We’re live from Samsung’s 2019 CES press conference!

You can always count on Samsung to put on a good show when CES rolls around, and it all starts with the company’s customary press conference. It’s always a great opportunity to catch up on the progress the company has made in the year prior, and dig into the devices and trends that Samsung thinks will define the new year. In typical Samsung fashion, though, it already made a handful of announcements before the show even started.

Let’s see: There’s an updated version of the Notebook 9 Pen to start, a trio of gorgeous monitors and a set of refreshed (not to mention artsy) QLED televisions. Oh, and let’s not forget a new “Remote Access” feature that will allow smart TVs to display compatible apps running on phones or PCs. That’s a pretty comprehensive list already, but knowing Samsung, you’d do well to expect a few more projects from right out of the blue. We’re still not exactly sure what those might be, though, so join us starting at 5 PM Eastern / 2 PM Pacific for our official Samsung CES liveblog — we can figure out all those details together.

Follow all the latest news from CES 2019 here!

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